New handbook, indicators and request for proposals issued for ending violence against children

New handbook, indicators and request for proposals issued for ending violence against children

Today WHO and partners release the INSPIRE handbook: action for implementing the seven strategies for ending violence against children, a guide to putting in place a select group of measures to prevent violence against children. Also today, UNICEF and partners launch the INSPIRE indicator guidance and results framework, a companion document designed to help monitor progress and track changes over time as the INSPIRE strategies are implemented.

The strategies will advance efforts to achieve Sustainable Development Goal target 16.2 to end all forms of violence against children. They are based on the best available evidence of what works, and include:

  • Implementation and enforcement of laws: such as those limiting access by young people to firearms and other weapons and those criminalizing the violent punishment of children by parents;
  • Norms and values: by changing beliefs and behaviours around gender roles;
  • Safe environments: by targeting violent “hotspots” and enhancing the built environment, for example, by improving housing;
  • Parent and caregiver support: such as the provision of training in parenting;
  • Income and economic strengthening: including microfinance combined with training around gender norms;
  • Response and support services: such as treatment programmes for juvenile offenders;
  • Education and life skills: for example, establishing a safe school environment and improving children’s life and social skills.

The new handbook, targeted towards policy-makers, practitioners and advocates, provides detailed information on how to select interventions that are best suited to national and local contexts, and how to implement the interventions and the package as a whole. Its guidance is relevant for all sectors whose work impacts on children, in particular the education, criminal justice, health and social welfare sectors. The indicator guidance includes a set of core indicators and information about how to define and measure them. The indicators are designed to be used side-by-side with the programming guidance for each strategy included in the implementation handbook.

The INSPIRE Working Group, an informal network of some 100 agencies committed to implementing INSPIRE-related programmes, has also launched a call for proposals to support INSPIRE awareness-raising and engagement activities in low- and middle-income countries. Funding is made possible by the New Venture Fund and Ignite Philanthropy: Inspiring the End to Violence Against Girls and Boys.

Globally, it is estimated that up to 1 billion children aged 2-17 years are subject to physical, sexual or emotional violence each year. For many of them, violence leads to severe, lifelong health and mental health consequences. Exposure to violence at an early age can impair brain development and propel victims to engage in risk behaviours such as smoking, alcohol and drug abuse, and unsafe sexual practices. Children who experience violence are also more likely to attempt suicide and endure a range of illnesses later in life, including anxiety, depression, heart and lung disease and HIV. At a societal level, violence places a massive burden on national economies, costing countries billions of US dollars each year in health care, law enforcement and lost productivity.

The INSPIRE handbook that provides everyone committed to ending violence against children with the best possible information on how to implement the INSPIRE strategies and interventions. Representatives of WHO and eight core partner agencies note in the foreword that: “The more we work together to implement the interventions described within it, and to measure the effectiveness of new interventions, the greater the number of children that will enjoy lives free from violence.”

RELATED LINKS

INSPIRE technical package for ending violence against children

INSPIRE Working Group’s call for proposals

INSPIRE Handbook: action for implementing the seven strategies for ending violence against children

INSPIRE Indicator Guidance and Results Framework

 

Copyright © 2018 Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, All rights reserved.

AGM 2018 – Preparation package

Dear members, we are excited to host the 2018 Annual General Meeting on April 27th!

Here are the details about the meeting and the support documents:

When

Friday, April 27 2018

8:00-4:30; coffee and lunch provided

Where

Save the Children Canada Office, Eglantyne Jebb room

4141 Yonge Street, Suite 300, North York, M2P 2A8

How to get there

TTC subway and Go Trains: York Mills station

Paid parking available at York Mills

 

We look forward to engaging with you soon during the AGM!

Joint Ministerial Letter: Safe Schools Declaration

The ICPNC joined with partners including the Canadian International Education Policy Working Group (CIEPWG), The Romeo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative and Human Rights Watch, in co-signing a joint public letter to the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, National Defence, and International Development and La Francophonie. The joint public letter welcomes Canada’s endorsement of the Safe Schools Declaration earlier this year, and urges the Government of Canada to continue Canada’s international leadership in support of protecting the rights of children affected by armed conflict.

For more information, please consult the final version of the joint letter.

International Journal of Human Rights Special 2017 Issue: Facilitating Meaningful Participation in Child Protection

ICPNC is cognizant of the need for greater emphasis on child protection as a development approach resulting in fertile ground for innovative work. The Child Participation Working Group proudly coordinated and contributed to International Journal of Human Rights Special 2017 Issue: Facilitating Meaningful Participation in Child Protection which was successfully published to discuss the challenges and opportunities that were highlighted at the Facilitating Child Protection in International Child Protection Conference regarding the actual and potential participatory role of children and young people in effective child protection.

Excerpt: In recent years, increasing international attention surrounding children and young people’s participation in international development and humanitarian interventions has grown. This special issue contributes perspectives from different continents and fields of study/disciplines. At the same time, the articles raise important questions regarding the import of children and young people’s participation in international child protection and readers will thereby be encouraged, it is hoped, to consider the implications for children’s rights in a broad range of practical settings as well as for child human rights theory. We hope that the arguments presented in this volume will add enthusiasm to ongoing, critical research and mobilization towards effective child protection.

Global Affairs Canada & ICPNC Universal Children’s Day Event (November 2016)

A huge thank you to all who supported the development and roll out of the Global Affairs Canada ICPNC collaborative Universal Children’s Day Event on November 24th! Congratulations to all for a very successful event that created space for quality meaningful participation and engagement of young people, exemplary panel presentations, and valuable discussion with the Child Protection Unit, Global Affairs Canada.

ICPNC was fortunate to have a group of over 40 children and youth grades 6 to 12  who were very interested in children’s rights, passionate in the initiatives they are leading in their own schools, and keen to ask questions during their private event and the panel. During the session, the young people learned about their rights through a participatory play-based activity, explored strengths and barriers to their rights, and delved into actions they can take as young people and recommendations they have for adults at the school, community, national and global level.

During the Panel, Karina Gould MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development highlighted that “children and youth are powerful agents of social change”, while child rights advocate and former senator, Landon Pearson shared her proudest moments of starting a movement of engaging child delegates in the World Fit for children summit in UN, David Morley, President and CEO, UNICEF Canada honed in on importance of child protection, and Divina Usabase, youth ambassador and advocate voiced a need for greater emphasis on Mental Health education and awareness.

The children and youth asked a plethora of questions on indigenous rights, poverty in Canada, LGBTQ rights, and what Canada was like prior to the UNCRC. A teacher from Hopewell school emailed that “the panel discussion was right at the kids’ level and they felt so respected, mature and important having these esteemed adults actively listening to their concerns and taking their questions seriously.”

Thank you to those who supported preparing questions for the panelists!

Child Participation and Safeguarding Briefing Note (October 2016)

Briefing Note 

By Christina Brinco and Tara M. Collins
With the valuable support of the Child Participation Working Group of the
International Child Protection Network of Canada

One of the more significant unifying exercises addressed through the Facilitating Child Participation in International Child Protection Conference, which convened at Ryerson University from October 5th and 6th, 2015, was a discussion on the definition of child and youth participation in relation to the elaboration from the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (2009). Plenary presentations discussed ways that NGOs have incorporated children’s participation in their activities. Following conversations about the definition of participation, plenary discussions delved into connecting children’s rights approaches to advance child and youth participation in planning, resolutions to protection, and inadequacies in current models of safeguarding.

Following conversations about the definition of participation, plenary discussions delved into connecting children’s rights approaches to advance child and youth participation in planning, resolutions to protection, and inadequacies in current models of safeguarding.

For the more information, please consult the ICPNC Briefing Note- Child Participation and Safeguarding (October 2016).

If you are interested in learning more about the recommendations arising from
conference discussions, please find here the Facilitating Child Participation in International Protection Summary to access conference materials.

Exploring Tensions in Child Participation in International Child Protection (October 2016)

Briefing Note
By Christina Brinco and Tara M. Collins

With the valuable support of the Child Participation Working Group of the
International Child Protection Network of Canada

The Facilitating Child Participation in International Child Protection Conference convened at Ryerson University from October 5th and 6th, 2015. Participants heard voices of professionals in the field of children’s rights from various academic institutions, government affiliates and non-governmental agencies and from children and youth. These children and youth were involved in a preparatory meeting in advance of the conference in order to support their understanding of the tensions.

During this meeting, many of their concerns were brought to light and added to the discourse at the conference that followed. The conference participants sought to address concerns in child participation and protection through the sharing of expertise in the field, and by addressing gaps in international frameworks. 

This briefing note disseminates the knowledge shared over the two conference days as they relate to current tensions

For an in-depth analysis please consult the Briefing Note- Exploring Tensions in Child Participation in International Child Protection.